Monthly Archives: August 2016

New Study Shows Newspapers are Still the Top Source of Local News

Local NewsA recent article on MediaPost provided data from a new study that focused on newspapers and their important role as a trusted source of local news.

The study, commissioned by AMG/Parade and researched by Coda Ventures, surveyed 1,000 local media users and found that :

  • 47% of local media users cited newspapers as the best source of deals
  • 49% said newspapers did the “best job” providing local news and information
  • 32% of local news consumers had visited a newspaper’s social-media channels in the last month
  • 40% of local news consumers said they had visited a newspaper web site in the past 30 days

Local newspapers continue to be a vital source of information to communities nationwide. Here at MediaBids, we place ads in local papers all across the country, and these ads get thousands of phone calls each month. Local papers are well read, and the ads placed in them provide great ROI for local and national advertisers alike. People pay attention to what’s going on in their towns, and there’s no more trusted source of information than the local paper.

As a side note, Coda Ventures, via their Triad Service, provides additional insights into newspaper ad and insert effectiveness. Below is a sample of the type of info they gather. We’d encourage you to take a look at their most recent full report: Click Here

Triad

Post by Jess Greiner

Print Ad Success, Happens To Be Just Like Fishing (no kidding!)

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I just returned from my annual trip to Alaska, where I did a lot of fishing with my kids. Stay with me for a minute, there is a point to this that relates to marketing in newspapers. I believe, that what I have learned about fishing applies to marketing in newspapers.

Not surprisingly, my kids all like catching fish more than they like waiting for fish to bite. The problem is that a big part of fishing is waiting (I always tell them, “that’s why they call it fishing, not catching”) and having faith that the fish will respond sometime soon. If my kids believe that we have gone to a bad spot or that there is no hope in trying, their attention to detail diminishes. Instead of checking the bait every few minutes, they check every hour. They don’t hold the rods, they put them in the boat’s rod holders. They are less likely to try different techniques or pay attention to where their bait is positioned. In short, fishing is a self-fulfilling prophecy. You are unlikely to be successful, unless you pay attention, which is easier to do when you believe that success is possible.

In an effort to counterbalance the inevitable impatience of children fishing, for the past several years I have manufactured a new “secret spot” that some unnamed but very wise old friend has told me about. I tell my kids that this friend caught monsters at this spot and their enthusiasm rises to a fever pitch. They believe that this spot will produce fishing glory, so they fish harder, are more attentive to detail and are more patient than they would be otherwise. So it is no big surprise that my fictitious “secret spot” always outperforms other areas that we fish.

Fishing is a hard thing to scientifically quantify and there is no doubt that a certain amount of luck factors into a good day of fishing. However, I firmly believe that there are many factors that a fisherperson can control and the expectation of success creates an environment where success is more likely.

Now, stay on the line, I am about to set the hook – marketing in newspapers is very similar to fishing.

As you probably know, we do a lot of response-based print marketing here at Mediabids. In response-based marketing there are two parties who are involved in a transaction. First, there is the advertiser who is trying to generate response for their goods or services. Second, there is the publication, who wants revenue from the results they generate for that advertiser.

Too often, I believe, all parties (and I include Mediabids in this group) don’t expect success for a specific ad in a specific publication. They want success, but they don’t expect it. All parties involved act like my kids when they are fishing in a spot they believe is unlikely to yield results. But attention to detail generates better results in fishing and in newspaper marketing. Maybe the ad would perform better with a different offer or at a different price point? Maybe the ad would generate more response if it ran in a different section of the publication or at a different size or on a different day of the week? Often it is the little things that determine the difference between an ad performing well or below expectations. However, if success is not expected, it is easy to ignore those little things, which only increases the odds of failure. It is too easy to say, “This ad isn’t going to work.” and not try anything. It is like my kids saying, “There are no fish here.”

We should all expect success from print advertising. We have all seen enough success stories to know that print can generate large numbers of highly qualified results. It should happen with every ad we place, but it doesn’t. It is the job of Mediabids, the advertiser and the publication to expect and demand that ads perform well.

Post by Jedd Gould.

Top Podcasts for a Better You

Head Phones

I have been one of those people, at times, that has been indifferent to the emergence of the digital age. I mean, I still read actual books…sometimes I even buy hardcover versions! I know. I know. What a Luddite, right?

But let’s be honest, unless you’re a big gamer, the internet has been -until the past few years- awash in advertising and A LOT of one-dimensional content that can be take it or leave it (there are many exceptions, of course.) In fact, among the most heavily visited sites on the old WWW have been newspaper sites -which is great, don’t get me wrong. But newspaper sites are hardly what all the fuss and promise of the internet has been about, until recently. As many of you likely already know, the latest generation of the internet (are we at 3.0 yet?) is about text, messaging and social media apps and accessing video and audio content. It’s the audio content (a.k.a. podcasts) that we’ll talk a bit more about here today.

Starting in 2015, especially with the popularity of Serial (from the makers of This American Life on NPR), podcasts have really begun to emerge. National Public Radio, the New York Times, Slate, ESPN and several other media outlets have really started to focus on podcast content, not to mention a myriad of other smaller players. After all, the production of podcasts doesn’t necessarily require much of an investment beyond a microphone, a server for storing the files and the time involved. As a media salesperson or an agency staffer, why should you care about podcasts?

Podcast audiences, generally speaking, are still relatively small so selling ad space in them or looking at them as a cornerstone of a media plan is a ways off..in terms of really being a part of the marketing conversation. But as a media seller or an agency staffer, the real value of podcasts to us is more basic – inspiration and education.

At the risk of sounding a little new age, listening to podcasts (like reading books or watching films) can help you be a better you. The exploration of ideas and hearing different perspectives on things that are happening in our world, will only help you -as a media seller- to make connections with others and -as an agency staffer- to be able to think of old problems in new ways. If you haven’t started to take some time for podcasts, the time is now. At the very least, if you’re still something of a Luddite like me, starting now you can still claim to be an early-adopter (even if it’s just barely the case.)

If you’re unsure of where to get started with podcasts, here are five from the worlds of journalism, business, culture, politics and entertainment to consider:

RadioLab

TED Radio Hour

The MOTH

SLATE Political Gabfest

WTF with Marc Maron

 

Post by Jim Jinks

 

Top Newspaper & Magazine Industry Websites

Internet Concept on Laptop

We’re always searching for the latest news about the evolution of print journalism and advertising. These blogs have fresh and interesting content that we highly recommend taking a look at:

Nieman Lab: Published by Harvard University, this website publishes its own unique take on all of the news, innovations and notable happenings in the new world of journalism. We especially like the daily newsletters they send.

Newsonomics:Ken Doctor is “a speaker and consultant, advising on new sustainable business models of contemporary journalism.” His site features coverage of the New York Times, paywalls, and all things about the digital transformation of traditional media.

AdAge: If you’re in the advertising industry, you’re probably intimately familiar with AdAge. It’s the preeminent publication covering the advertising and marketing industries, and provides instant alerts on the latest news in the world of agencies & all topics media.

The Drum: The Drum is a  site that publishes out of Europe and has its own unique voice covering everything marketing. We think it’s one of the best all-around marketing/advertising sites available today.

Poynter: Poynter is one of the leading voices of journalism, and is actually a teaching institution that educates the best and brightest in the news industry.

MediaPost: MediaPost offers a variety of publications that cover print, television, mobile, social, email, tech and political marketing.

Media Life: Media Life is geared specifically towards media planners & buyers and is published by industry veteran and all-around great guy Gene Ely.

Print in the Mix: Print in the Mix is a project of the Rochester Institute of Technology and is a data-driven website that covers aspects of print ranging from newspapers to 3D printing.

Jim Romenesko: The personal blog of journalist Jim Romanesko, writing from his unique vantage point of being a top journalist at several newspapers and other media entities.

Mr. Magazine: Mr. Magazine also goes by the name of Samir Husni, a magazine industry veteran who provides insightful stats about trends in the industry, reports of new magazines forthcoming and those who are no longer with us, and many interesting publication provides.

Reflections of a Newsasaur – Alan Mutter has run the gamut of roles in the media world – from newspaper journalist to television and internet endeavors, he’s one of the most respected voices in the disucssion of the new age of journalism.

Post by Jess Greiner

Millennials & Boomers

Berlin Wall

I’m of the Gen-X generation. If you don’t really know what that means, don’t worry about it. Despite the fact that MTV, Ferris Bueller and the fall of the Berlin Wall happened on our watch, marketers are almost entirely consumed by the habits of the pre- and post Gen-X generations. You may know them by their more traditional labels – Baby Boomers and Millennials. In fact, based on how much time those of us in marketing and media spend thinking and talking about boomers and millennials, the Gen-X generation is a apparently a mere footnote of demography.  Yes, I’m a little annoyed about this, but I digress.

In print media organizations, especially, there’s a great deal of concern about how the media consumption habits of boomers and millennials differ. People with an axe to grind (digital, TV and radio media sellers, for example) are fond of saying that print’s audience is dying off….as if only older Americans read print. This is, of course, not the story.

The media consumption habits of millennials and boomers do differ, in some ways. But in terms of ”old” media, the differences are not all that significant. In other words, there’s no Berlin Wall separating the two largest generations of the past hundred years (just us Gen-Xers.)

Based on a recent study by Jacobs Media Strategies, these are the percentages of use (at least once per week) for each demographic:

Boomers – Radio (89%), Newspapers (86%) and TV (81%)

Millennials – Radio (80%), Newspapers (71%) and TV (72%)

Also, the Jacobs study reports that tablet, text and Smartphone usage are not all that different between these two groups.

Of course, the spread (15%) between boomers and millennials, for newspaper usage, is widest but it’s not that much different than radio and TV. My point is that the media habits of younger Americans and older Americans, on a macro level, are not that different and it’s untrue that newspaper readers are simply dying off.

But if you’re determined to claim that millennials are so different than the generations that have come before them, I will offer that in terms of podcasts, streaming video, streaming audio and social networks, millennials do use these media by a wide margin over boomers. However, it’s probably just a matter of time before boomers adopt more millennial-like media habits, with regard to these newer technologies. The rapid adoption of Smartphones and tablets among boomers, shows that sometimes old dogs can learn new tricks.

Post by Jim Jinks

 

 

 

 

Advertisers are Leaving Money on the Table

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By skipping print, advertisers are leaving money on the table.  While brands need to adjust to changing demographics and media consumption preferences, research shows under-spending in traditional media decreases incremental revenue.

Utilizing multiple media sources is important according to the Advertising Research Foundation.  Their neuroscience research shows “advertising is more likely to be encoded in long-term memory if people encounter it in multiple media,” according to Manuel Garcia-Garcia, senior VP for research and innovation in global ad effectiveness at the ARF.

An article originally published in AdAge outlines Nielsen Catalina Solutions research with KraftHeinz’s Crystal Light and Time Inc. which showed that adding print and digital to a TV campaign had a major impact on improving ROI.

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Credit: Neilsen Catalina Solutions

By adding $3M spend in print through Time Inc., Crystal Light was able to add $16M in sales.

We can help you add print to the mix and make your cash register ring – contact Mediabids at 860-379-9602 or email dmauke@mediabids.com.

Gear Up for the Big Game with a DirecTV Ad

Football season is fast approaching, and MediaBids has the perfect ad for your readers. DirecTV is offering a special deal this football season – For $60/month (a fixed price for two years!) new DirecTV subscribers will get the NFL Sunday Ticket (which gives them access to every live game, every Sunday) plus the regular lineup of DirecTV channels, a free HD DVR upgrade and no startup costs.

Run this ad in your publication and get paid each time one of your readers makes a qualifying phone call. Click here to request the ad and MediaBids will make it to your specs, in time for your next deadline. Call us at 960-379-9602 if you have questions.

A sample of the ad is below:

DirecTVNFLOffer

Inspiration and Authenticity are Key Factors in Social Sharing

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Have you been watching the Olympics?  Following along with the games can be a great distraction from less inspiring and hopeful news stories this summer.

Despite declined ratings, NBC has sold over $1.2B in ad time.  And though we’re now seeing viewers experiencing the Olympics in ever-changing ways (live streaming, in-app viewing, online recaps, etc.), advertisers are still adjusting to this new media landscape.

Yesterday, AdWeek examined the popularity of Under Armour’s Michael Phelps ad and what makes it one of the most shared Olympics spots ever.  (See original article here)

One key takeaways is that “inspiration” is a critical emotional response that encourages social sharing among millennial men (ages 18-34).  Most sharing, unsurprisingly, comes from Facebook and Twitter.

Authenticity is another key brand attribute that elicits shares: “Especially with younger viewers, over three-quarters will lose trust in a brand if an ad feels fake. Under Armour’s recent campaigns are all consistently authentic. They’re doing a really nice job of drawing this out and creating new content that all work really well together in their content stack, in this authentic way of portraying athletes and their origin stories, showing the things that you don’t always see” says  Devra Prywes, VP, marketing and insight at Unruly.

Here, The Drum looks at more campaigns from brands like Nike, P&G, Minute Maid, and Nissan.  And you can find all the Olympics coverage from AdAge here.

GO USA!

Vibrant Ads for Print Publications

Have you seen the newest ads for print editions of newspapers and magazines from MediaBids’ Performance Print Advertising Program? If not, you should take a look. When publishers run these ads, they get paid for each qualifying response the ads generate. MediaBids makes the ad custom to each publication’s specifications. Click on the links below to learn more about each ad:

ABCMouse.com

abcmousesample

BistroMD

BistroMDSample

Print Ads Are 100% Viewable

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An article this morning on The Drum discussed concerns from advertisers over digital ad viewablity.

Digital advertising has drawn  a huge portion of ad dollars away from print over the past decade. Its transparency, click/conversion tracking capabilities, distribution potential as well as granular targeting have won over the minds of most marketers. But, digital advertising is not perfect, and advertisers are starting to have some serious concerns about how often their digital ads are actually seen.

According to Digiday, “up to 54 percent of (digital) ads aren’t viewable“. That means marketers are wasting up to half of their digital advertising budgets are ads that will never be seen by anyone.

In the course of this article, Robert Thompson, the CEO of News Corp. made a great point in favor of print ads –

“As I’ve said before and it’s worth emphasizing again, every print ad is 100% viewable.”

So true. Not only are print ads 100% viewable, but they’re also acted upon. From just the ads we place in print, we see thousands of phone calls a day. Print ads are less intrusive. Print ads have longevity. Print ads deserve a bigger place in the minds of marketers.