Monthly Archives: August 2016

Top Marketers to Follow @Twitter

I started using Twitter, somewhat, back in 2011. It wasn’t until 2014 that I began to be more of a daily user and started to publish tweets on a regular basis. Twitter launched in 2006 so I was a relatively late adopter -perhaps I should have little to say- but it’s 2016 and especially if you’re a salesperson for a digital and/or print publisher, you really need to be using Twitter by now.

Twitter

It really is an invaluable tool for keeping up with the news of the day, especially in both the publishing and marketing industries. For one thing, your publication’s editorial department is using Twitter. Second, many of your clients are likely using Twitter and the advertising agency buyers you call on are for sure using Twitter. Why aren’t you?

In a less than scientific survey of media reps, these are the three most frequent reasons for not using Twitter:

  1. Why would I use it if I don’t know who to follow?
  2. I don’t think anyone would care what I tweet so why bother?
  3. I already get plenty of industry email newsletters…I don’t have time for Twitter!

Let’s start with #3.

Are you reading those industry email newsletters? If you’re following the knowledgeable people that actually aim to offer their audience valuable insights and support, then it’s relatively easy to glance at Twitter -here and there throughout the day- without it taking too much time or being disruptive to your workflow.

Regarding the second objection to Twitter (”I don’t think anyone would care what I tweet.”), you may be surprised at your own value to others in your industry so don’t hesitate to tweet out if you have an original thought or something to say. But also, no one is forcing you to tweet. You can use Twitter, and it is still valuable to you, even if you never ever respond or share anything on Twitter.

Now #1 is indeed a valid objection and I can relate. Twitter is a little intimidating at first, because after all, we don’t know what we don’t know. But for those of you ready to try something new and you’d appreciate a little help in taking the leap, here’s a few leading voices in marketing to consider following, be inspired by and perhaps learn from on Twitter:

@jeffbullas

@kimgarst

@jaybaer

@dharmesh

@JoePulizzi

Of course, there are at least forty other thought leaders one could follow. But once you get started you’ll learn quickly how to curate your own list.

Be well and good luck!

Post by Jim Jinks (@JimJinksCT and @Mediabids)

 

 

Back-to-School Shopping Season 2016

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As is the case here in CT, many states have tax-free weeks to encourage back-to-school shopping towards the end of August (17 states total – though many are cutting back on discounts being offered).  As such, many advertisers and retailers have begun ramping up their back-to-school advertising campaigns.

According to eMarketer, US retail e-commerce sales in July and August will increase 15% over last year.  This growth can be mostly attributed to overall growth in e-commerce.  Marketers are fighting to get their piece of that pie.  The back to school season represents 17.2% of full-year retail sales, so it’s critical for retailers to dedicate appropriate advertising budget to drive sales during this time period.

Marketing Land reports consumers will spend 42% of their budget on apparel, 26% on books and supplies, and 13% on consumer electronics.  As reported by the New York Times, the National Retail Federation estimates families with children in kindergarten through high school will spend an overage of $674 on back-to-school shopping for a total industry-wide spend of $75.8 billion in the US.  This is an 7% overall increase over last year.  51% of consumers plan to start shopping 3-4 weeks before school starts.  44% of consumers plan to shop at a discount store, 43% in a department store, and 38% plan to shop online.

Marketers will likely spend more than $241 million on back-to-school advertising.  Many retailers opt for newspaper inserts to broadcast sales, though TV campaigns are widely popular, as well as digital and social campaign components.

Here’s a glimpse into some popular national retailers’ ad campaigns this year:

Best Buy

Office Depot 

Target

Kohls

And just for fun, one of the most memorable back-to-school campaigns of all time:

If you have ads you’d like to place in newspapers or magazines this back-to-school season, contact us here at Mediabids at 860-379-9602.  Happy shopping!

Why All Newspapers Should Be Running This Print Ad

CDCPost
Sample print ad for Canada Drug Center – one of MediaBids’ Top Performing Advertisers

Chances are, sometime in your life you’ll need to take a prescription drug. According to the CDC, 50% of all Americans used a prescription drug in the past 30 days, and that number is growing.

That means a high percentage of your readers would benefit from the services of Canada Drug Center – which means your newspaper will benefit too. Here’s how:

Canada Drug Center is part of MediaBids’ Performance-Based Print Advertising Program. They will pay your newspaper or magazine for every qualifying call the ad generates. They’ve been part of this program for over 5 years, and have generated millions of dollars in revenue for publishers running their ad.

  • 73% of all Canada Drug ads that publications run generate revenue
  • 45% of all phone calls qualify as a paid response

So, what is so appealing to consumers about Canada Drug Center?

Great Prices – Consumers can save up to 90% off their regular prescription prices when they switch to Canada Drug Center.

Trusted Affiliations – Canada Drug Center is accredited by the Canadian International Pharmacy Association – an elite organization that only certifies the most trusted, compliant and high-quality pharmacies. Canada Drug Center is also verified by PharmacyChecker.com.

If your newspaper or magazine would like to earn money by running this ad, simply click here and let us know what ad size you need, and we’ll get it to you in time for your next edition. Questions? Call MediaBids at 800.545.1135 for more information.

Winning In Local Elections: Three Steps to More ”Political” Sales for Local Print Sellers

2016

This Presidential election season is proving to be one of the most contentious (not to mention utterly bizarre) since perhaps the 1960s. But even in 2016, newspapers continue to be very important and an influential media channel. In the past week, for example, the Washington Post and the Houston Chronicle have made headlines by endorsing Hillary Clinton very early in the general election campaign. They both cited their primary reason as the ”danger” that Trump poses to our country. But while Hillary and Trump get most of the big media attention, as an ad salesperson for a local daily or weekly community paper there are plenty of sales opportunities in races for state and/or local municipal positions and issue campaigns.

As a media buyer by training and as someone active in local politics, here’s my advice to local print ad sellers who want to be rock stars in selling to local political campaigns:

  1. Make Sure They Know You – Contact the local town or county committee chairperson in your area -often these folks may know reporters or editorial personnel at your paper but they’re not likely to know you. Call them -email will likely get ignored- and ask them about the upcoming elections. Committee chairpersons will likely know, and have the direct contact info, for the campaign managers and other key people involved in any and all local races. Elections at the local level are not big ”organizations.” Other than the candidate, there are usually only one to two other people in the inner circle.
  2. Know Your Value To The Campaign – While there are billions being spent on national and statewide elections –see AdAge– campaigns at the local level (even races for the state assembly) are usually on a shoestring. There’s also generally limits to how much a candidate can contribute to their own campaign and at the local level this amount can be very low. Among the largest line items in a local campaign’s budget are for campaign signage, events and direct mail. You have an opportunity to grab some of the direct mail budget but you have to show how you can reach households at a very cost-effective and competitive price point. Also, be sure the powers that be in the campaign know that your newspaper can do the graphic design and ad production work at little to no cost. Don’t let the campaign think they can’t ”do print” simply because they don’t have the ad design expertise.
  3. Run a Special Local Election Supplement – Voters look to newspapers for guidance and information. In reading your pages, voters are actively thinking about the election and the issues that matter. If a campaign has an ad there, it’s not unlike having an AdWords text ad show up in search results on Google. A campaign ad in a local paper is an ideal placement but campaigns sometimes need to be sold on this reality – especially if the candidate is new politics and campaigns. One way to really entice a campaign to advertise in your paper is to run a special election supplement. My local weekly paper sends all the candidates the same set of questions and they use the responses as the main content for a local election supplement that runs the week before the election. Once you have one campaign advertiser….others will follow, believe me. The last thing a political campaign wants to have happen is to be absent when the opposition is present.

Generally speaking, local campaigns really begin in earnest after Labor Day. So forget about Hillary and Trump, now is the time to begin laying the groundwork for garnering a slice of the billions and billions spent in political campaigns in 2016. Good luck!

Post by Jim Jinks.